Georgia O'Keffee

Georgia O'Keffee

One interpretation of the Georgia O'Keeffe biography is this woman was a badass. Georgia O’Keeffe was born November 15, 1887, near Sun Prairie, Wisconsin and died March 6, 1986 in Santa Fe. She was among the most influential figures in American art. O'Keeffe discovered the beauty of Northerm New Mexico in the 1930's and made the beautiful Ghost Ranch area her permanent home in 1949.

As she painted the landscape and architectural subjects in Abiquiu or at Ghost Ranch, she effectively claimed a piece of the vast American West as her own and it has come to be known as “O’Keeffe country.” Being in New Mexico made it possible for O’Keeffe to realize herself in yet another way; by allowing widely published journalists and photojournalists into her isolated and exotic world, she defined herself to the public as an uncompromising, determined, self-made individualist.

O’Keeffe has remained one of the most important and admired Modernist painters in the United States and one of its most celebrated icons. Through her consistently provocative and distinctively personal approach to image making, she created a body of work that conveys the integrity of her Modernist vision, her independent spirit, and, above all, her profound sensitivity to the vitality of natural forces. In largely overcoming many critics’ gendered interpretations of her work, O’Keeffe played a key role in teaching the art community and the general public that gender was in no way a determinant of artistic competence or creativity. Thus, she helped to establish a new and significant space for female artists in a realm that has continued to be dominated by men.